Connections Across Time and Space: Alfrid Bustanov’s Documentary "The Legacy of Siberian Muslims"

The documentary embedded below (also viewable at this link) is the product of careful ethnographic research almost seven years in the making.  For Alfrid Bustanov, who received his doctorate from the University of Amsterdam just months ago, following these Siberian families is a labor of love.  Continue reading Connections Across Time and Space: Alfrid Bustanov’s Documentary "The Legacy of Siberian Muslims"

Two Millennia in Four Months: Scott Levi on Taming the Central Asian History Survey Course

One of my aims here on Bactriana is to fuel a dialogue not only about Central Asian historical scholarship, but teaching as well. I reached out to Scott Levi at the Ohio State University for an initial foray into this topic because his research has endeavored to place Central Asia within the broader dialogue of world history. Infusing intimidating proper nouns like “Qarakitai” and “Maturidi” with thematic historical significance in an introductory survey course is no simple task, but one for which Levi is especially well-suited.
Continue reading Two Millennia in Four Months: Scott Levi on Taming the Central Asian History Survey Course

Central Asian Digital Repositories

Digital repositories are one of the most prominent elements of the open access movement in universities today. Collecting publications, resources, and content generated by an institution and making them available to the public creates an online archive and serves as a representation of the institution. Universities, research institutions, and libraries are most often responsible for managing these repositories (for background information, Lynch). However, single university institutional repositories that are often associated with Western universities are largely absent from the Central Asian region. Continue reading Central Asian Digital Repositories

Where are the Moderate Protestants? Reimagining Religious Identity in Boston and Bishkek

946524_10151338295621863_820180304_nWhile the debate continues over whether to try Dzhokhar Tsarnaev as an enemy combatant, he and his brother Tamerlan appear to have solidified that status in the American consciousness already, as evidenced by a recent magazine cover in which the Caucasian brothers are depicted with dark skin, thick eyebrows, and narrow, furtive eyes.  The reference to Islamic terrorism in the title apparently necessitated these phenotypic modifications, just as the resulting visages seem to intimate terrorism, even without proof that the Tsarnaevs’ goal in bombing the Boston Marathon was to terrorize as a means to a determinable end.  Continue reading Where are the Moderate Protestants? Reimagining Religious Identity in Boston and Bishkek