Category Archives: Ethnography

Personal Reflections on Kunduz and the Bombing of the MSF Hospital

When I heard Kunduz, a major city in the north of Afghanistan, had been overtaken by the Taliban, I was shocked. The shock did not stem from surprise, or a disbelief that Talib fighters might be capable of such a victory, despite the psychological impact, the possible loss of morale, that the takeover led to. Kunduz had long been the most problematic city in the north of the country. A mix of ethnicities, interwoven with vying political factions, meant that the Taliban were able to take advantage while the city was essentially mismanaged. Continue reading Personal Reflections on Kunduz and the Bombing of the MSF Hospital

CESS Book Award for Study on Osh & Interpreting Authoritarianism

At the last CESS Conference at Columbia University, Morgan Liu (our new CESS Blog editor!) received the CESS Book Award for best monograph in the social sciences published 2012-2013 for Under Solomon’s Throne: Uzbek Visions of Societal Renewal in Osh (2012 Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press).    Continue reading CESS Book Award for Study on Osh & Interpreting Authoritarianism

From Exeter CASN, Catherine Owen’s “Researchers at Risk: Debating the Dilemmas of Research in Authoritarian Societies”

(Reposted by agreement with the Exeter Central Asian Studies Network.  The original, posted on Oct 3, 2014, can be found here.)< Continue reading From Exeter CASN, Catherine Owen’s “Researchers at Risk: Debating the Dilemmas of Research in Authoritarian Societies”

Learning to See Invisible Children: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Central Asia

cover artEducation is the first institution of society outside the family that touches a child’s life through attendance of a kindergarten or primary school. Children who learn the lessons of prejudice, oppression, and corruption through exclusion from education or discrimination in the classroom will internalize and perpetuate these values as adults, making societies less cohesive and less equitable. Continue reading Learning to See Invisible Children: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Central Asia