Category Archives: Conflict

The Xinjiang Conflict, Western Response, & Lessons for Academics and Policy Makers – Part II

Broader Lessons to Be Learned

A recent Foreign Policy op-ed by Whitney Kassel on the Xinjiang conflict represents an excellent example of the conceptual divide between the academic and policy-security communities. Continue reading The Xinjiang Conflict, Western Response, & Lessons for Academics and Policy Makers – Part II

The Xinjiang Conflict, Western Response, & Lessons for Academics and Policy Makers – Part I

In a private English lesson in a classroom in Urumqi, a young Han Chinese girl and I were discussing American TV. A lull in the conversation led to a pause, and she hesitated. A furtive look came across her face as she checked her surroundings for eavesdroppers. “You know…I hate Uighur people”, she said.< Continue reading The Xinjiang Conflict, Western Response, & Lessons for Academics and Policy Makers – Part I

Crimea, Central Asia, & Russia: Cheat Sheet Part One

Introduction and Overview

Russia’s recent military incursion into the Crimea has brought a level of attention to the northern Black Sea region rarely seen over the last couple of centuries. This corner of the northern Black Sea is generally not a source of daily global news. Nonetheless, when the world’s focus is drawn to Crimea, it seldom disappoints. Continue reading Crimea, Central Asia, & Russia: Cheat Sheet Part One

CESS award-winner Roberto Carmack’s “’True Sons and Daughters of the Kazakh People’: Frontline Propaganda Among Kazakh Soldiers, 1941-1945”

CESS Grad Student Award 2013At the last CESS Conference in Madison, Wisconsin (October 2013), Roberto Carmack was awarded the 2013 CESS Graduate Student Paper Award.  Roberto is a PhD candidate in the history department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  He is currently completing his dissertation, entitled “The Mobilized and the Repressed: The Peoples of Kazakhstan at War, 1941-1945”.   Continue reading CESS award-winner Roberto Carmack’s “’True Sons and Daughters of the Kazakh People’: Frontline Propaganda Among Kazakh Soldiers, 1941-1945”