Category Archives: Anthropology

Learning to See Invisible Children: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Central Asia

cover artEducation is the first institution of society outside the family that touches a child’s life through attendance of a kindergarten or primary school. Children who learn the lessons of prejudice, oppression, and corruption through exclusion from education or discrimination in the classroom will internalize and perpetuate these values as adults, making societies less cohesive and less equitable. Continue reading Learning to See Invisible Children: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Central Asia

Living Shrines of Uyghur China: Between Art and Document (part II)

Continued from the previous post: Living Shrines of Uyghur China: Between Spirit and Politics

“I wanted the viewer to be the believer, to stand in front of this marker imbued with so much faith and have an intimate experience”—Lisa Ross, Photographer
Continue reading Living Shrines of Uyghur China: Between Art and Document (part II)

Living Shrines of Uyghur China: Between Spirit and Politics (part I)

“The history of the shrine is less important than its current function: many of the shrines’ actual histories and religious initiations have been forgotten over time. It is through a specific function that shrines derive their real meaning for the people who visit them.”—Rahila Dawut, Uyghur Ethnographer
Continue reading Living Shrines of Uyghur China: Between Spirit and Politics (part I)

Long Shadow of Herodotus: Joe Ricci on Ancient Rome’s own Perilous Frontier

While in St. Petersburg on a recent research trip, I was intrigued to learn that Joe Ricci, a colleague from my Princeton cohort, is living in the city long term.  After all, I knew Ricci as a scholar of Byzantine history, and Constantinople lies a rather long way from the Gulf of Finland, and Rome further still.  What follows is the outcome of a lengthy discussion about steppe-sedentary dynamics, Late Roman history, and Soviet archaeology.
Continue reading Long Shadow of Herodotus: Joe Ricci on Ancient Rome’s own Perilous Frontier